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AuthorEvan Ponter

Evan Ponter is a Salesforce Admin Hero from Baltimore, MD who has been focusing on declarative development since 2012. His desire to keep an org simple, streamlined, and maintainable by future admins has led him to being an expert on the declarative features of the platform. A deep understanding of reports, the importance of proper data modeling, and the utilization of declarative automation tools have propelled Evan along a blossoming Salesforce journey where he solves complex problems using clever solutions that provide the ultimate flexibility. When he's not logged into Salesforce, Evan enjoys playing bass guitar in a local rock band.

Year-To-Date Year-Over-Year Filter Options in Salesforce Reports and Dashboards

You can build a single dashboard along with the necessary source reports and allow the running user to choose their time frame with the ease and simplicity of selecting an option from a drop down menu. Up to 50 time frame options can be predefined using this method and you have complete control over the display values for those options. Easily compare the current year-to-date (or fiscal year-to-date) to the same time frame during the previous year. You can even show trends over multiple years.

Count the Number of Date Groups in a Report Dynamically

A report request comes in asking for a calculation showing the average number of records created in a week. The time frame for this report could be set to a few different values – like last year, last quarter, or over the course of the previous two years. Ideally, the calculation would be dynamic and count the number of weeks that are present in the report results so that these time frame adjustments can be made on the fly. Using a formula field on the object and a summary formula field within a report, you can dynamically count the number of date groups shown in the report results at run time. Let’s dive into the specifics on both pieces of this solution so you can implement it in your org for your use case.

Reporting on Activities

If you’ve ever tried to create reports on the activities that your users are meticulously entering, you may have run into some perplexing behavior. We have a handful of strategies you can utilize in order to bring some normalcy to the activity object in reports. You’ll even be able to create an “Activities (Deluxe)” report type by the end of this article.

The Ultimate Guide to Report Types: Deluxe Report Types

Imagine if you had a single custom report type per object that could address a majority of the requests you have to create a report using data from that object. This is similar to the concept of “one process builder per object” or “one trigger per object” – you create one custom report type per object that you want to report on.

The Ultimate Guide to Report Types: How Do Report Types Work?

When working with reports in Salesforce, you will find that report types have a major effect on what you are able to manipulate. Report types control what report results have the potential to show, what objects you have access to, what fields are available, and how certain report features will behave. This is the first filter being applied to the data.

Data Modeling to Facilitate Reports

The report engine in Salesforce relies on the relationships that are explicitly defined in order to join together data from multiple objects. This means your data architecture determines what native Salesforce reports will be capable of producing. Here are four concepts to consider for data modelling that will allow you to build the reports you desire.